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Amla (Amalaki) Powder - Organic (1 lb)

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Amla powder(aka Amalaki or Indian Gooseberry) is known as the Great Rejuvenator. It is traditionally used for a variety of digestive problems, enhancing cellular regeneration and is well known for its possible antibacterial and antioxidant properties. It may support a healthy heart and brain through promoting stronger circulation. It has also been used to improve eyesight, regulate elimination, enhances fertility, help the urinary system, acts as a body coolant, flushes out toxins, increases vitality, strengthens the eyes, improves muscle tone, strengthen the bones and teeth and cause hair and nails to grow. Fortifying for the liver, spleen and lungs, amla is excellent for helping to flush out toxins and has been used for thousands of years in Ayurvedic herbal applications.

Unlike many superfoods being introduced today, the chemical profile of raw amalaka cannot be limited to one star ingredient or beneficial compound. Instead, research has discovered an unparalleled spectrum of powerful anti-oxidants, polyphenols, tannic acids and bioflavonoids. Amla also contains a high concentration of amino acids, trace minerals and other beneficial phytonutrients.

Raw Amla Powder (Amalaki) also contains the potent phenolic combination of ellagic acid, gallic acid and emblicanin A+B. Together these polyphenols are important for reducing cellular and oxidative stress, destroying immune damaging free radicals and supporting the overall detoxification of the body. The bioflavonoids, rutin and quercetin also contribute to the overall antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and youth promoting qualities of this remarkable fruit. Additionally, amla contains the potent antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase and catalase.

Amla may also be used externally and may work as an excellent moisturizer promoting healthy radiant skin, hair and nails. Raw Amla can be used in shampoos to nourish the hair and scalp and may prevent premature grey hair.

Some possible traditional uses of Raw Organic Amla Fruit Powder may include:

● Increasing blood flow & circulation even to your smallest capillaries
● Supporting healthy cholesterol levels
● Strong antioxidant properties
● May reduce clot-causing fibrin levels
● May prevent premature grey hair
● Acting as a body coolant
● Flushing out toxins
● Nourishing the brain & may improve mental functions
● Fortifying for the liver, spleen & lungs
● Excellent full body rejuvenator
● Preventing oxidant-induced thickening of vessel walls
● Improving muscle tone
● Helping the urinary system
● May reduce total cholesterol & LDL in animal studies
● May support a healthy heart
● May improve blood vessel flexibility
● Supporting healthy cardiovascular system88-91
● Increasing vitality
● May reduce blood sugar in diabetic laboratory animals
● Antibacterial
● Enhancing cellular regeneration
● Preventing inflammatory blood cells from “sticking” to endothelial linings
● May Strengthen the bones & teeth
● May improve digestion
● Curbing free-radical oxidation of cholesterol in your heart & arteries
● Regulating elimination
● Reducing serum & tissue lipid levels in animals by mechanisms similar to those of the “statin” drugs—but without detectable adverse effects
● May lower your C-reactive protein
● May Reduce both systolic & diastolic
● Enhancing fertility
● Shielding you against cardiovascular inflammation
● Causing hair & nails to grow
● May strengthen & improving eyesight
● Containing ellagic acid, gallic acid, emblicanin A+B, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase & catalase


Our Raw Organic Amla Fruit Powder comes from sustainably harvested Amalaki trees natively grown in India. No chemicals or pesticides are used in the cultivation.

Suggested Use: Mix 1 teaspoon with juice, yogurt or add to your favorite smoothie.

Botanical Name: Emblica Officinalis

Other Names: Amalaki, Indian Gooseberry

Ingredients: Organic Amla Powder.

Origin: India - Certified Organic

Z Natural Foods strives to offer the highest quality organically grown, raw, vegan, gluten free, non-GMO products available and exclusively uses low temperature drying techniques to preserve all the vital enzymes and nutrients. Our Amla (Amalaki) Fruit Powder is certified organic and passes our strict quality assurance which includes testing for botanical identity, heavy metals, chemicals and microbiological contaminants. ZNaturalFoods.com offers Raw Organic Amla Powder packaged in airtight stand-up, resealable foil pouches for optimum freshness. Once opened, just push the air out of the pouch before resealing it in order to preserve maximum potency. Keep your Organic Raw Amla Powder in a cool, dark, dry place.

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