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Ginger Root Powder - Organic (1 lb)

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Native to southeastern Asia, a region whose cuisines still feature this wonderfully spicy herb, ginger has been renowned for millennia in many areas throughout the world. Non- GMO ginger is mentioned in ancient Chinese, Indian and Middle Eastern writings, and has long been prized for its aromatic, culinary and medicinal properties. After the ancient Romans imported ginger from China almost two thousand years ago, its popularity in Europe remained centered in the Mediterranean region until the Middle Ages when its use spread throughout other countries.

Historically, ginger has a long tradition of being very effective in possibly alleviating symptoms of gastrointestinal distress. In herbal medicine, ginger is regarded as an excellent carminative (a substance which promotes the elimination of intestinal gas) and intestinal spasmolytic (a substance which relaxes and soothes the intestinal tract). Modern scientific research has revealed that ginger possesses numerous therapeutic properties including antioxidant effects and the ability to inhibit the formation of inflammatory compounds.

Ginger has been well researched and many of its traditional uses confirmed. It is well known to support the body through travel sickness, nausea and indigestion. It is a warming remedy, ideal for supporting healthy circulation thereby maintaining healthy blood pressure and possibly keeping the blood thin in higher doses. Ginger may possess anti-viral effects thereby supporting immune system health. Ginger may support a healthy inflammation response and there has been much recent interest in its use for joint problems. If a person has exercised too much or suffers from arthritis or rheumatism, ginger has been traditionally used to possible ease that inflammation or put the fire out. Due to its ability to possibly support healthy circulation, ginger is thought to possibly improve the complexion. It may possibly reduce nervousness, eased tendonitis, and helped sore throats return to normal. Studies demonstrate that ginger may lower cholesterol levels by reducing cholesterol absorption in the blood and liver. It may also aid in preventing internal blood clots.

This stimulating herb is warming to the system. In her book '10 Essential Herbs' author Lalitha Thomas describes the properties: "The major active ingredients in ginger are terpenes (quite similar to the chemical action of turpentine) and an oleo-resin called ginger oil. These two, and other active ingredients in ginger, provide antiseptic, lymph-cleansing, circulation-stimulating, and mild constipation relief qualities along with a potent perspiration-inducing action that is quite effective in cleansing the system of toxins."

Some possible traditional uses of Raw Organic Ginger Root Powder may include:

● May support gastrointestinal health
● Topical gingerol may provide protection against UVB-induced skin disorders
● May support a healthy inflammation response
● May help in prevention of internal blood clots
● May reduce headaches
● Lymph-cleansing properties
● May ease tendonitis
● May Support healthy kidney function
● May support Cardiovascular health
● Stimulating production of digestive juices
● May support bowel disorders
● May reduce neurological problems
● Therapeutic properties for hypertension
● May have Anti-viral & Antimicrobial properties - internally & topically as an antiseptic
● Helping to eliminate congestion
● May Reduce sore throat pain & irritation when made into tea
● Combating chills & fever
● Supports a healthy immune response
● Contains Gingerol & 6-shogaol which may support overall wellness
● May support blood vessel health
● May prevent the formation of new ulcers
● May reduce coughs & bronchitis
● Anti-vomiting properties even for severe nausea (hyperemesis gravidum)
● Potent perspiration-inducing action that is quite effective in cleansing the system of toxins
● May support healthy lipid levels
● Combats loss of appetite
● May support healthy circulation in high doses
● Reducing Vertigo
● Warming properties for entire body
● May provide antiseptic qualities
● May support healthy blood sugar levels
● May reduce and support the recovery from fevers, colds, & flu through its possible anti-viral properties
● Supporting healthy menstruation
● May support osteoarthritis & rheumatoid arthritis
● May Suppress helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)
● Mild constipation relief qualities
● May Decrease inflammation in muscle tissue caused by overexertion
● May Reduce nausea resulting from chemotherapy, motion sickness, pregnancy, & surgery
● Supporting healthy blood-pressure levels
● May Decreasing dyspepsia (bloating, heartburn, flatulence)
● May reduce travel & motion sickness & nausea when combined with papaya


Suggested Use: 1 teaspoons daily.

Botanical Name: Zingiber officinale

Other Names: Black ginger, Canton ginger, Cochin ginger, Common ginger, Garden ginger, Gingembre, Imber, Jamaican ginger

Ingredients: Raw Organic Ginger Root Powder.

Origin: India - Certified Organic

Warning: Not to be used during pregnancy.

Z Natural Foods strives to offer the highest quality organically grown, raw, vegan, gluten free, non-GMO products available and exclusively uses low temperature drying techniques to preserve all the vital enzymes and nutrients. Our Raw Ginger Root Powder is certified organic and passes our strict quality assurance which includes testing for botanical identity, heavy metals, chemicals and microbiological contaminants. ZNaturalFoods.com offers Raw Organic Ginger Root Powder packaged in airtight stand-up, resealable foil pouches for optimum freshness. Once opened, just push the air out of the pouch before resealing it in order to preserve maximum potency. Keep your Raw Organic Ginger Root Powder in a cool, dark, dry place.

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