Goat Whey Protein Concentrate (1 lb)

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Our Grass-Fed, hormone free, unflavored, 100% pure, non-GMO Goat Whey Protein Concentrate delivers the crucial amino acids for cellular repair, growth, and glutathione production. Our Goat Whey Concentrate is only pasteurized once at 163° F for 15 seconds so remains undenatured. It is made with a blend of acid and sweet goat cheese whey. The sweet whey comes from kosher rennet set hardstyle goat cheese and our acid whey comes from soft goat cheese; giving it the perfect blend of flavors.

Whey is nature's perfect protein, boasting a 104 Biological Value (BV). BV is the ability of the body to use the nutrients. The higher the number the more useful to the body. Our goat whey protein has a higher BV than an egg (100 BV) which is considered the gold standard by which all proteins are measured.

Our 80% Goat Whey Protein Concentrate powder is undenatured and very high in whey protein fractions. This is the purest form of Goat Whey Protein Concentrate on the market because we haven't added anything to it resulting in a very clean tasting Goat Whey Concentrate that mixes easily. The lack of distinct flavor makes it great for people who dislike the taste of typical protein powders with artificial flavors and additives.

Several components of goat whey may inhibit the growth of a wide range of bad bacteria, fungi, yeast and protozoa. Whey has a high content of the essential amino acids threonine, valine, methionine, isoleucine, leucine, phenylalanine, lysine, histidine and tryptophan. Essential amino acids cannot be made by the human body and must come from food. They help the body to break down food, grow and repair body tissue and perform many other functions. In addition, tryptophan may encourage a positive mental outlook.

Studies have shown that whey proteins may inhibit the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE); similar to blood pressure lowering pharmaceuticals (without the harmful side effects). In addition, proteins in whey may reduce the stickiness of blood platelets; which can trigger both heart attack and stroke. The consumption of grass-fed goat whey protein may also help to support healthy lipid levels.

Whey contains a protein called lactoferrin which supports a healthy immune system and inflammation response. Research has shown that lactoferrin could have long term positive impacts on the effects of osteoporosis and non healing bone fractures. Our goat whey protein also contains prebiotics and probiotics. Prebiotics are foods or compounds that are fermented by good bacteria in the colon after they've entered the system. When used in combination with a good probiotic, whey proteins provide added assurance that your "second immune system" (your gut) is getting the help it needs.

Some possible traditional uses of undenatured Goat Whey Protein Concentrate Powder may include:

● 22 grams of high-quality protein per 28 gram serving - 80% Protein
● Pasteurized at 163° F for 15 seconds
● Comes from grass fed goats
● No hormones or antibiotics
● Supports a healthy immune response
● Rich in peptides, essential and nonessential amino acids
● May support a healthy aging process
● Encourages healthy energy levels
● Natural source of cystine for maximum glutathione production
● Undenatured
● Natural source of branched-chain amino acids
● Excellent for weight management - Lots of protein keeps you full longer
● High protein efficiency ratio
● May support muscle recovery after physical activity
● Supports lean muscle tissue
● rBGH & rBST free
● No additives, fillers, artificial sweeteners, flavors, coloring, or preservatives
● An alternative to cow’s whey for lactose sensitive individuals


Allergens: Milk

Suggested Use: Mix 7 level tablespoons / 1 ounce (28 grams ) with 12 ounces of cold water, skim milk or juice and thoroughly mix in a blender, shaker or with a spoon for 20-30 seconds. For best results, consume 1-2 servings daily, with one serving post exercise. Can also be blended into your favorite smoothie.

Mixing suggestions: To increase flavor and nutritional profile combine with our organic shredded coconut and banana flakes.

Other Names: Concentre de Proteine de Petit-Lait Bovin, Fraction de Lactoserum, Fraction de Petit-Lait, Isolat de Proteine de Lactoserum, Isolat de Proteine de Petit-Lait, Lactoserum de Lait de Chavre, MBP, Milk Protein, Milk Protein Concentrate, Mineral Whey Concentrate, Protea­nas del Suero de la Leche, Proteine de Lactoserum, Proteine de Lait, Proteine de Petit-Lait, Whey, Whey Fraction, Whey Peptides, Whey Concentrate, WPC.

Ingredients: Goat Whey Protein Concentrate

Origin: Raised and processed in USA. Packaged with care in Florida, USA.

Z Natural Foods strives to offer the highest quality organically grown, raw, vegan, gluten free, non-GMO products available and exclusively uses low temperature drying techniques to preserve all the vital enzymes and nutrients. Our Goat Whey Protein Concentrate Powder passes our strict quality assurance which includes testing for protein content, heavy metals, chemicals and microbiological contaminants. ZNaturalFoods.com offers Goat Whey Protein Concentrate packaged in airtight stand-up, resealable foil pouches for optimum freshness. Once opened, just push the air out of the pouch before resealing it in order to preserve maximum potency. Keep your Goat Whey Protein Concentrate powder in a cool, dark, dry place.

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89. Infante Pina D, Tormo Carnice R and Conde Zandueta M, 2003.

90. [Use of goat's milk in patients with cow's milk allergy]. Anales de Pediatria, 59, 138-142.

91. Jenness R, 1980. Composition and Characteristics of Goat Milk: Review 1968-1979. Journal of Dairy Science, 63, 1605-1630.

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94. Martin P, Szymanowska M, Zwierzchowski L and Leroux C, 2002.

95. The impact of genetic polymorphisms on the protein composition of ruminant milks. Reproduction, Nutrition, Development, 42, 433-459.

96. Muñoz Martín T, de la Hoz Caballer B, Marañón Lizana F, González Mendiola R, Prieto Montaño P and Sánchez Cano M, 2004. Selective allergy to sheep's and goat's milk proteins. Allergologia et Immunopathologia, 32, 39-41.

97. Neveu C, Riaublanc A, Miranda G, Chich JF and Martin P, 2002. Is the apocrine milk secretion process observed in the goat species rooted in the perturbation of the intracellular transport mechanism induced by defective alleles at the alpha(s1)-Cn locus? Reproduction, Nutrition, Development, 42, 163-172.

98. Park YW, 2007. Rheological characteristics of goat and sheep milk. Small Ruminant Research, 68, 73-87.

99. Park YW, Juárez M, Ramos M and Haenlein GFW, 2007. Physico-chemical characteristics of goat and sheep milk. Small Ruminant Research, 68, 88-113.

100. Prosser CG, McLaren RD, Frost D, Agnew M and Lowry DJ, 2008. Composition of the non-protein nitrogen fraction of goat whole milk powder and goat milk-based infant and follow-on formulae.

101. International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition, 59, 123-133.

102. Rutherfurd SM, Moughan PJ, Lowry D and Prosser CG, 2008.

103. Amino acid composition determined using multiple hydrolysis times for three goat milk formulations. International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition, 59, 679-690.

104. WHO (World Health Organization), 2009. Anthro for personal computers, version 3. Software for assessing growth and development of the world's children.

105. WHO Multicentre Growth Reference Study Group, 2006. WHO Child Growth Standards based on length/height, weight and age. Acta Paediatrica Supplement, 450, 76-85.

106. Zhou J, Sullivan T, Gibson R and Makrides M, 2010. A randomised trial to compare growth rates and nutritional status of infants fed formula based on goat milk or cow milk (TIGGA).

107. Neveu C, Riaublanc A, Miranda G, Chich JF and Martin P, 2002. Is the apocrine milk secretion process observed in the goat species rooted in the perturbation of the intracellular transport mechanism induced by defective alleles at the alpha(s1)-Cn locus?


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