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Red Raspberry Powder - Freeze Dried (5 lbs)

Our Price: $159.99


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Red Raspberries rank near the top of all fruits for antioxidant strength, particularly due to their rich content of ellagic acid (from ellagotannins), quercetin, gallic acid, anthocyanins, cyanidins, pelargonidins, catechins, kaempferol and salicylic acid.

Anthocyanins found in raspberries, which act as pigments to give berries their deep color, are a major component of the phenolic/flavonoid class. Recent research shows that anthocyanins act as antioxidants, providing many potential health benefits. Researchers are currently linking anthocyanin activity to possibly improving vision, controlling diabetes, improving circulation, fighting cancer, and retarding the effects of aging, particularly loss of memory and motor skills. Raspberries' anthocyanins also give these delectable berries unique antimicrobial properties, including the ability to prevent overgrowth of certain bacteria and fungi in the body. Quercetin and catechins are flavonols found in raspberries that act as antioxidants that support the body's immune system and may contribute to cancer prevention. Quercetin has also been shown to reduce the release of histamine and may be effective against allergies.

One of the most promising benefits of red raspberries is that they are significant source of ellagic acid. This substance belongs to the family of phytonutrients called tannins, and is viewed as being responsible for a good portion of the antioxidant activity of this (and other) berries. Ellagic acid has become a known as a possible potent anti-carcinogenic/anti-mutagenic compound. Clinical tests conducted at the Hollings Cancer Institute at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) show that ellagic acid, a naturally occurring plant phenol may be the most potent way to possibly combat cancer, inhibit the growth of cancer cells, and arrest the growth of cancer in subjects with a genetic predisposition for the disease. Ellagic acid may possibly act as a scavenger to "bind" cancer-causing chemicals, making them inactive. It also may inhibit the ability of other chemicals to cause mutations in bacteria. In addition, ellagic acid from red raspberries may prevent binding of carcinogens to DNA, and may reduce the incidence of cancer in cultured human cells exposed to carcinogens.

Raspberries are an excellent source of fiber, manganese and vitamin C. They are a very good source of vitamin K and a good source of magnesium, folate, omega-3 fatty acids, copper, vitamin E and potassium. But eating whole berries or berry powder has been shown in scientific studies to be more beneficial than taking the individual phytochemicals in the form of dietary supplements

Some possible traditional uses of Raw Freeze Dried Red Raspberry Powder may include:

● Highest food source of ellagic acid
● Almost 50% higher antioxidant activity than strawberries because of high levels of tannins
● May help prevent the development of early atherosclerosis
● Ability to prevent overgrowth of certain bacteria & fungi in the body
● High in polyphenolic compounds known for their anti-cancer properties
● Contain strong antioxidants such as Vitamin C, quercetin & gallic acid
● Red raspberry ketones are currently being used in Japan as a weight loss supplement in a pill form and as an external patch
● Good source of anthocyanins including quercetin, kaempferol cyanidin-3-glucosylrutinoside & cyanidin-3-rutinoside
● Raspberries have been shown to inhibit the production of COX-I and COX-II enzymes. Anti inflammatory products like ibuprofen & aspirin, inhibit COX-I and COX-II resulting in the reduction of pain associated with arthritis, gout & other inflammatory conditions


Fragrantly sweet with a subtly tart overtone our freeze dried raspberry powder is wonderfully delicious and nutritious.

Suggested Use: Mix 1 tablespoon with recipes, juice, yogurt or chocolate.

Botanical Name: Rubus idaeus

Other Names: Red Raspberry, Raspbis, Hindberry, Bramble of Mount Ida, Bramblebush, Raspberry

Ingredients: Freeze Dried Raspberry Powder.

Origin: Chile

Z Natural Foods strives to offer the highest quality organically grown, raw, vegan, gluten free, non-GMO products available and exclusively uses low temperature drying techniques to preserve all the vital enzymes and nutrients. Our Raw Red Raspberries powder is Freeze Dried and passes our strict quality assurance which includes testing for botanical identity, heavy metals, chemicals and microbiological contaminants. ZNaturalFoods.com offers Raw Freeze Dried Red Raspberries Powder packaged in airtight stand-up, resealable foil pouches for optimum freshness. Once opened, just push the air out of the pouch before resealing it in order to preserve maximum potency. Keep your Raw Freeze Dried Red Raspberries Powder in a cool, dark, dry place.

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