Fenugreek Seed Powder - Organic

Fenugreek Seed Powder - Organic

Archaeologists have dated the usage of fenugreek back to 4000 BC, after the spice was excavated in Tell Halal, Iraq. The Egyptians used the seeds to make incense for embalming rituals of their dead. While well known for its medicinal uses it has also been an important part of many cultures for it’s culinary application. In India it is used for making different types of curries and when the seeds are roasted it is used as a coffee substitute.

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The name Fenugreek comes from the plant’s latin name trigonella foenum graecum which means “greek hay”. The name is symbolic of the Greeks as they were known to traditionally add fenugreek to low quality hay for their livestock. Fenugreek is the fruit portion of a herbaceous plant native to Europe and India. The plant itself during the summer months produces tiny yellow or white flowers and once they have bloomed, long thin pods containing brown colored seeds appear.  The seeds are usually collected in the fall. The seeds are a nourishing source of protein, as well as, 50% fiber and 25% mucilage which is what contributes to its soothing qualities.  

Much of the nourishing qualities in fenugreek seeds are found in the saponins and specific types of fiber. The fiber is very rich in mucilin properties which is what gives it a gummy texture. This gelatinous fiber is traditionally used to soothe irritated tissue throughout the body. While this foods is a nourishing source of minerals and B vitamins it also packs a phytonutrient punch. Some of the phytonutrients include trigonelline, yamogenin, gitogenin, tigogenin, diosgenin, neotigogens. It is these and the many other phytonutrients that have given this herb a great reputation with herbalists all over the world for supporting a woman’s ability to help produce mother’s milk. Research supports this generally happening within 72 hours of consumption.

Fenugreek is known in herbal medicine as a double direction herb because it’s also known to support male vitality despite much of the research indicating that it has no direct primary effects on testosterone levels. One specific study mentions that a standardized version of this herb was given to 60 men between the ages of 25 and 52 at a dosage of 600 mgs daily for 6 weeks. The outcome of the study was that this standardized version had overall positive effects on physiological aspects of vitality. It also showed positive effects on muscle strength and energy. Fenugreek appears to inhibit aromatase and 5a-reductase activity. Therefore, it was concluded that fenugreek may assist the body in maintaining normal healthy levels of vitality via secondary actions and not directly via testosterone.

One area where fenugreek is well studied is in its ability to possibly support healthy blood sugar and lipid levels. Fenugreek contains an amino acid called 4-hydroxyisoleucine, which when used in its whole food form appears to support the body's ability to produce insulin when blood sugar levels are high. One study concluded that when using the whole food version where the natural fiber and saponin levels were present that after only eight days of use it showed positive effects on supporting healthy blood sugar levels.  Another study showed that a daily dose given to rats (100 or 500 mg/kg) lowered LDL, VLDL, triglycerides and total cholesterol and increased HDL’s. Both of these studies concluded that fenugreek as a whole food may support the body’s ability to maintain healthy lipid and blood sugar levels.  

Some possible traditional uses of Raw Organic Fenugreek Seed Powder may include:

  • May support healthy blood sugar levels
  • May support healthy lipid levels
  • May support healthy kidney function
  • May support relief of irritated tissue
  • May support the production of mother’s milk
  • May support male vitality

Constituents of Fenugreek include:

  • Minerals: Calcium, Iron, Magnesium, Phosphorus, Potassium, Zinc, Copper, Manganese, Selenium
  • Vitamins: Vitamin C, Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin B-6, Folate,  Vitamin A (RAE), Vitamin A (IU), Vitamin D
  • Amino Acids: Tryptophan, Threonine, Isoleucine, Leucine,. Lysine, Methionine, Cystine, Phenylalanine, Tyrosine, Valine, Arginine, Histidine, Alanine, Aspartic Acid, Glutamic Acid, Proline, Serine, Glycine
  • Alkaloids: Trigonelline
  • Polyphenols: Gallic Acid, Phytic Acid
  • Steroid saponins: Furostanol, Trigonella
  • Volatile oils
  • Sapogenins: Yamogenin, Gitogenin, Tigogenin, Neotigogens
  • Other: Phosphates, Lecithin, Nucleo-albumin

Suggested Use: Mix one tablespoon in your favorite juice or smoothie.

Other Preparations:

Tincture: This method can take 15 to 30 days. You will need 3 items (mason jar with cover, the herb/herbs of your choice, liquid for extracting). The extracting liquid can be alcohol, alcohol/ water combo, vinegar or vegetable glycerin. Take the product and fill the jar ¾ full, add the liquid of your choice to the very top with leaving as little space as possible and close the jar. Then shake the jar so everything is well mixed. Give the jar a good 5 minute shake, several times a day.  After 15 to 30 days strain and bottle in glass tincture jars. The length of time you soak the herbs will depend on what you use as an extracting liquid.  

Mixing Suggestions: To increase flavor and nutritional profile combine with our organic cinnamon and organic cayenne powders.

Other Names: Alholva, Bird's Foot, Bockshornklee, Bockshorn same, Chandrika, Egypt Fenugreek, Fenogreco, Fenugrec, Foenugraeci Semen, Foenugreek, Greek Clover, Greek Hay, Greek Hay Seed, Hu Lu Ba, Medhika, Methi, Methika, Sénégrain, Sénégré, Trigonella, Trigonella Foenum, Trigonella foenum-graecum, Trigonella, goats horn, foenugraecum.

Parts Used: Fenugreek Seed.

Botanical Name: Trigonella foenum-graecum.

Ingredients: Raw Fenugreek Seed Powder.

Origin: Grown and milled in India. Packaged with care in Florida, USA.

Certifications: USDA Certified Organic.

Z Natural Foods strives to offer the highest quality organically grown, raw, vegan, gluten free, non-GMO products available and exclusively uses low temperature drying techniques to preserve all the vital enzymes and nutrients. Our Raw Fenugreek Seed Powder is certified organic and passes our strict quality assurance which typically includes testing for botanical identity, heavy metals, chemicals and microbiological contaminants. ZNaturalFoods.com offers Raw Organic Fenugreek Seed Powder packaged in airtight stand-up, resealable foil pouches for optimum freshness. Once opened, just push the air out of the pouch before resealing it in order to preserve maximum potency. Keep your Organic Raw Fenugreek Seed Powder in a cool, dark, dry place.

 

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