Adzuki Beans - Organic

Our Organic Adzuki Beans have a sweet, nutty flavor and can be sprouted or cooked to a soft consistency. Popular in Asia and often used to sweeten desserts, adzuki beans can be served as a side dish mixed with rice or your favorite greens.

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Our Organic Adzuki Beans have a sweet, nutty flavor and can be sprouted or cooked to a soft consistency. Popular in Asia and often used to sweeten desserts, adzuki beans can be served as a side dish mixed with rice or your favorite greens.

Adzuki beans are a nutrient-dense food, providing a generous source of nutrients compared to their low caloric content. They are a source of potassium, phosphorus, magnesium, iron, manganese, and zinc. They also contain vitamins B6, B2, B1, B3, and folic acid. Adzukis may help to support healthy energy levels, digestive function, a healthy weight, balanced urinary system, healthy elimination, and a strong metabolism.

To Sprout: Soak 1/2 cup of organic adzuki beans in cool 70ºF filtered water for 12 hours. Then rinse and drain well. Keep seeds out of direct sunlight and rinse and drain thoroughly with cool water every 8 to 12 hours for the next 3 days. You may stop when the sprouts are small or continue to rinse and drain every 8 to 12 hours until the sprouts have reached your desired length.

Some possible traditional benefits of Raw Organic Adzuki Beans may include:

  • May help the liver to detoxify
  • May support the elimination of wastes from the body
  • May help to prevent the body from absorbing harmful substances
  • May support the bladder, reproductive functions and kidneys
  • Possibly helps to reduce the level of LDL cholesterol in the blood 
  • May help maintain healthy blood sugar levels  
  • Possibly supports a strong metabolism 
  • May support a healthy weight and provide feelings of fullness

Constituents in Adzuki Beans include:

  • Carbohydrates
  • Protein

  • Minerals: Calcium, Iron, Magnesium, Phosphorus, Potassium, Sodium, Zinc

  • Vitamins: Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B-6, Folate DFE, Vitamin A (IU), Vitamin A (RAE)

  • Flavonoids: Flavonones, Dihydrochalcones, Dihydroflavonols, Flavan-3,4-diols

To Sprout: Soak 1/2 cup of organic adzuki beans in cool 70ºF filtered water for 12 hours. Then rinse and drain well. Keep seeds out of direct sunlight and rinse and drain thoroughly with cool water every 8 to 12 hours for the next 3 days. You may stop when the sprouts are small or continue to rinse and drain every 8 to 12 hours until the sprouts have reached your desired length. Once this occurs, remove any seed hulls, rinse and dry with a paper towel. Once dry, put in a sealed container and store in the refrigerator until ready to use. Yields approximately 1 cup (8 oz) of sprouts. 

To Cook: Place organic adzuki beans in a colander and rinse under cold water. Soak beans for four hours or overnight. For each cup of soaked beans add three cups of water, bring to a boil. Reduce flame to medium low for 10 minutes, skim off and discard any foam. Cover and lower heat. Simmer on low for approx. 45 minutes Hold off adding seasoning to beans until tender. Adding at the beginning will hinder the beans from cooking properly.

Botanical Name: Vigna angularis.

Other Names: Asian Red Beans, Aduki Beans, Asuki, Field Pea, Frijoles, Habichuela.

Ingredients: Raw Organic Adzuki Beans.

Origin: Grown in China. Packaged with care in Florida, USA.

Certifications: USDA Certified Organic.

Z Natural Foods strives to offer the highest quality organically grown, raw, vegan, gluten free, non-GMO products available and exclusively uses low temperature drying techniques to preserve all the vital enzymes and nutrients. Our raw Adzuki Beans pass our strict quality assurance which typically includes testing for botanical identity, heavy metals, chemicals and microbiological contaminants. ZNaturalFoods.com offers raw organic Adzuki Beans packaged in airtight stand-up, resealable foil pouches for optimum freshness. Once opened, just push the air out of the pouch before resealing it in order to preserve maximum potency. Keep your organic raw Adzuki Beans in a cool, dark, dry place.

 

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